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Latest Articles

1: Credit Reports And Judgments
Now, the credit bureaus no longer take action on judgments sent to them by individuals.

2: Priority Of Tax Liens
What if you receive a letter from the county treasurer, advising you of a "Notice of Sale of Tax-Defaulted Property"?

3: Levying IRAs
What if your debtor has a non-ERISA IRA retirement account, can it be levied?

4: Federal Writs
In my experience, it is fairly easy to get another writ in some other federal court.

5: Judgments And Trusts
What if you learn that your judgment debtor is a beneficiary of their parent's trust?

6: Becoming A Certified Fiduciary
Certified fiduciaries are regulated by the state.

7: Levies On Prepaid Rent
Is prepayment of rent subject to a creditor's levy?

8: Will Your Debtor Use California CCP 3432?
What if the California debtor is a company that uses CCP 3432 ?

9: Judgments And Partnerships
What if your judgment debtor owns part of a property, business, or some other asset in a 50/50 general partnership with someone else?

10: Finding A Judgment Debtor's Address
To recover a judgment, you do not always need to know where your debtor lives.